References

 

Film, Television, Radio and Audio

  • African American Footprints Leading to the Future.” Eye on Dance. WNYC/TV. New York. 7 Feb. 1992. Television.
  • “Ben Sidran: How Jews Influenced American Music.” KQED. Forum with Michael Krasny. 5, Apr, 2013. Radio
  • “Changing Trends in Dance: Black Choreographers.” Eye on Dance and the Arts. WNYC/TV. New York City. 23 May 1998. Television.
  • “Check Your Body at the Door.” Dir. Charles Atlas and Sally Sommer. DMGI Studio. 2012. Video.
  • “The Dream Keepers.” I’ll Make Me A World. Blackside, Inc. and Thirteen/WNET. New York City. 2 Feb. 1999. Television.
  • “Ebony Towers.” America Beyond the Color Line with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Prod. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. PBS. 2002. Television.
  • “From Shtetl to Swing.” Narr. by Harvey Fierstein. Great Performances. Dir. Fabienne Rousso-Lenoir. PBS. 5 Oct. 2005. Television.
  • Horwitz, Dawn Lille, Jonnie Greene and Penny Ward. “Black Ballet Companies and Black Dancers in White Companies.” Classic Black. The New York Public Library Dance Collection. Prod. The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and The Dance Research Foundation. 1996. Video.
  • “Social Dancing; At The Cotton Club and the Savoy.” Eye on Dance and the Arts. WNYC/TV. New York City. 21 Feb. 1985. Television.
  • That Rhythm, Those Blues. Dir. George T. Nierenberg. American Experience. PBS/WGBH. 1988. TV Movie.
  • “The Story of Jazz.” Masters of American Music. BMG. 2002. Video.
  • “Third World Dance: Defining Black Dance.” Eye on Dance.  WNYC/TV. New York City. 14 May 1981. Television.
  • “Writers Explore What It Means To Be ‘Black Cool’.” Narr. Neal Conan. Talk of the Nation, National Public Radio. KQED, San Francisco, 14 Feb. 2012. Radio.

 

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Books

  • Abraham, W. E. The Mind of Africa. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962. Print.
  • Abrahams, Roger D. Down Deep in The Jungle: Negro Narrative Folklore From The Streets of Philadelphia. Chicago: Aldine Publishing Company, 1970. Print.
  • Abrahams, Roger D. and John F. Szwed. Ed. After Africa: Extracts From British Accounts and Journals of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries Concerning The Slaves, Their Manners, and Customs in the British West Indies. Connecticut: Yale University Press. 1983.
  • Angelou, Maya. The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou. New York: Random House Books, 1994. Print.
  • Astaire, Fred. Steps in Time: An Autobiography. New York: Cooper Square Press, 2000. Print.
  • Brown, Jayna. Babylon Girls: Black Women Performers and The Shaping of The Modern. North Carolina: Duke University Press, 2008. Print.
  • Burgard, Timothy Anglin. “Beat Culture and the New America: 1950-1965 – Rebels with a Cause.” Fine Arts. M.H. de Young Memorial Museum and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor – Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. San Francisco: Oct., Nov., Dec. 1996. Book or Art exhibit? https://catalyst.library.jhu.edu/catalog/bib_1809817
    http://books.google.com/books/about/Beat_culture_and_the_New_America_1950_19.html?id=907rAAAAMAAJ
  • Bogle, Donald. Brown Sugar: Eighty Years of America’s Black Female Superstars. New York: Da Capo Press. 1980.
  • Boross, Robert. “African-American Contributions to Theatrical Dance.” Image of Perfection: The Freestyle Dance of Matt Mattox. New York University. 1994.
  • Campbell, Joseph. The Power of Myth. New York: Doubleday. 1988.
  • Caponi, Gena Dagel. Introduction. “The Case for an African-American Aesthetic” Signifyin(g), Sanctifyin, & Slam Dunking: A Reader in African American Expressive Culture. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. 1999.
  • Childers, Joseph and Gary Hentzi. The Columbia University Dictionary of Modern Literary and Cultural Criticism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1995.
  • Crowley, Chris and Henry S. Lodge, M.D. Younger Next Year for Woman. New York: Workman Publishing. 2005.
  • Cooper Albright, Ann. Choreographing Difference: The Body and Identity in Contemporary Dance. Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press. 1997.
  • Coryton White, Katherine and Robert Farris Thompson. African Art in Motion: Icon and Act in the Collection of Katherine Coryton White. California: University of California Press. 1979.
  • Cumber Dance, Daryl, ed. Honey, Hush! An Anthology of African American Women’s Humor. New York: W. W  Norton and Company. 1998.
  • Daniel, Yvonne. Dancing Wisdom: Embodied Knowledge in Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomblé. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2005. Print.
  • De Frantz, Thomas. “Ballet in Black: Louis Johnson and African American Vernacular humor in Ballet.” Dancing Bodies, Living Histories: New Writings about Dance and Culture. Ed. Lisa Doolittle and Anne Flynn. Alberta: Banff Center Press, 1999. Print.
  • De Frantz, Thomas.  Dancing Revelations: Alvin Ailey’s Embodiment of African American Culture. New York. Oxford University Press. 2004Print.
  • Dixon Gottschild, Brenda. Waltzing in the Dark: African American Vaudeville and Race Politics in the Swing Era. New York: St Martin’s Press. 2000. Print.
  • Driskell, David. African American Visual Aesthetics: A Postmodern View. Washington & London: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995. Print.
  • Evans, David. Big Road Blues: Tradition And Creativity In The Folk Blues. California: University of California Press, 1982. Print.
  • Folley-Cooper, Marquette, Deborah Macanic, and Janice McNeil. “Article/Chapter Title.” Seeing Jazz: Artists and Writers on Jazz. Ed. Elizabeth Goldson. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1997. Print.
  • Freire, Paolo. The Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Trans. Myre Berman Ramos. New York: Continuum International, 1979. Print.
  • Fu Kiau, K.K. Bunseki. “Ntangu Tandu Kolo: The Bantu Kongo Concept of Time.” Time in the Black Experience. Joseph K. Adjaye, ed. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1994. Print.
  • Fu Kiau, K.K. Bunseki. Afriacn COsmology of the Bantu-Kongo: Tying the Spiritual Knot, Principles of Life and Living. 2nd Ed. New York: Athelia Henrietta Press. 2001. Print
  • Galbraith, John Kenneth. The Economics of Innocent Fraud: Truth for Our Time. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. 2004. Print.
  • Gardner, Howard. Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: Basic Books. 1993. Print.
  • George, Nadine A. “Dance and Identity Politics in American Negro Vaudeville: The Whiteman Sisters, 1900-1935.” Dancing Many Drums: Excavations in African American Dance. Ed. Thomas DeFrantz. Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press. 2002. Print.
  • George-Graves, Nadine. Urban Bush Woman: Twenty Years of African American Dance Theatre, Community Engagement, and Working it Out. The University of Wisconsin Press. 2010. Print.
  • Glass, Barbara. African American Dance: An Illustrated History. North Carolina and London: McFarland & Company, 2006. Print.
  • Herskovits, Melville J. The Myth of The Negro Past. Boston: Beacon Press. 1941, 1958 and 1990. Print.
  • Herskovits, Melville J. “What Has Africa Given America?” The New World Negro: Selected Papers in Afroamerican Studies. Ed. Frances S. Herskovits. Bloomington: Indian University Press. 2004. Print (p. 170)
  • Highwater, Jamake. Dance: Rituals of Experience. 3rd ed. Pennington, New Jersey: Princeton Book Company. 1992. Print.
  • Holloway, J.E. (ed.) Africanisms in American Culture. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 1990. Print.
  • Holloway, Hurston, Zora Neale. “Characteristics of Negro Expression.” Negro: An Anthology. Ed. Nancy Cunard. New York: Continuum, 2002. Print.
  • Hurston, Zora Neale. “Characteristics of Negro Expression.” Sweat. Ed. Cheryl Wall. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1997. Print.
  • Hurston, Zora Neale. The Complete Stories. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics Edition. 2008. Print.
  • Jackson, Richard. Black Writers and Latin America: Cross-Cultural Affinities. Howard University Press, 1998. Print
  • Jahn, Janheinz. Introduction. Muntu: African Culture and the Western World. 1961. New York: Grove Press. 1990. Print.
  • Jones, J.M. “Toward a Cultural Psychology of African Americans.” Online Readings in Psychology and Culture 3.1. Aug 2002. Web. 3 June, 2005.
  • Jones, LeRoi (Amiri Baraka). Blues People: Negro Music in White America. New York: Harper Perennial, 2002. Print.
  • King-Dorset, Rodreguez. Black Dance in London 1730-1850: Innovation, Tradition and Resistance. London: McFarland, 2008. Print.
  • Kraut, Anthea. Choreographing Copyright: Race, Gender, and Intellectual Property Rights in American Dance. New York. Oxford University Press. 2015.
  • Kraut, Anthea. Choreographing the Folk: The Dance Stagings of Zora Neale Hurston. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2008. Print.
  • Laban, Rudolf. Book Title. Location of publisher: Publisher name, Year published. Print.
  • Lewis-Ferguson, Julinda. Ed. “Blacks in Postmodern Dance”. Black Choreographers Moving Toward the 21st Century: A National Dialogue. Berkeley: Expansion Arts Services. 1991. Print.
  • Locke, Alain Leroy, ed. The New Negro: An Interpretation. New York: Albert and Charles Boni, 1925. Print.
  • Lomax, Alan. The Land Where the Blues Began. New York: Dell Publishing. 1993. Print.
  • Long, Richard A. The Black Tradition in American Dance. New York: Rizzoli International, 1989. Print.
  • Malone, Jacqui, ”Keep to the Rhythm and you’ll Keep to Life: Meaning and life in African Vernacular Dance.” Signifyin(g), Sanctifyin, & Slam Dunking: A Reader in African American Expressive Culture. Ed. Gena Dagel Caponi Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. 1999. Print.
  • Manning, Susan. Modern Dance, Negro Dance: Race in Motion. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2004. Print.
  • Mbiti, J. Concepts of God in Africa. London: SPCK Press. 1970. Print
  • Mbiti, J. frican Religion and Philosophy. Oxford: Heinemann Press. 1990. Print
  • Morris,  Paul J., II and Stephen Tchudi. The New Literacy. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996. Print.
  • Morrison, Toni. Jazz. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. 1992. Print.
  • Murphy, Jacqueline Shea. The People Have Never Stopped Dancing: Native American Modern Dance History. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007. Print.
  • Needham, Maureen. “Kykunkor, or the Witch Woman: An African Opera in America, 1934”. Dancing Many Drums: Excavations in African American Dance. Ed. Thomas F. DeFrantz.  Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2002. Print.
  • Omry, Keren. “Blues notes: a discourse of race in the poetry of Langston Hughes.” Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston and Corregidora by Gayle Jones.” Cross Rhythm: Jazz Aesthetics in African-American Literature. Continuum International Publishing Group, 2008. Print.
  • Osumare, Halifu. The Africanist Aesthetic in Global Hip-Hop: Power Moves. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2007. Print.
  • O’Meally, Robert. “Rhythm.” Seeing Jazz: Artists and Writers on Jazz. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. 1997. Print.
  • Philips, John Edward. “The African Heritage of White America.” Africanisms In American Culture 2nd. Ed Joseph E. Holloway. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 2005. Print
  • Powell, Richard. “Re/Birth of a Nation.” Rhapsodies in Black: Art of the Harlem Renaissance. California: University of California Press, 1997. Print.
  • Perpener, John O., III. African-American Concert Dance: The Harlem Renaissance and Beyond. Chicago: University of Illinois Press. 2001. Print.
  • Ramsey, Guthrie P.,  Jr. Race  Music. Berkeley: University of California Press. 2003. Print.
  • Raphael-Hernandez, Heike and Shannon Steen, eds. AfroAsian Encounters: Culture, History, Politics. New York: New York University Press. 2006. Print.
  • Rogin, Michael. Blackface, White Noise: Jewish Immigrants in the Hollywood Melting Pot. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998. Print.
  • Singleton, Theresa A. (ed.) “I, Too, Am American”: Archaeological Studies of African American Life. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia. 1999.
  • Sloat, Susanna, ed. Caribbean Dance From Abaqu à to Zouk: How Movement Shapes Identity. Gainesville, Florida: University Press of Florida. 2005. Print.
  • Sims, Lowery Stokes. Challenge of the Modern:African-American Artists 1925-1945. Volume I. New York: Studio Museum in Harlem. 2003. Print.
  • Stearns, Marshall and Stearns, Jean. Jazz Dance: An American Vernacular Dance Form. 1964. New York: Shirmer, 1979. Print.
  • Taylor, Billy. “Jazz and Dance, A Personal View.” Modern Dance, Jazz Music and American Culture. Ed. Gerald E. Meyers. American Dance Festival and the John F. Kennedy Center for The Performing Arts. February 2000. Print.
  • Thompson, Robert Farris. ”An Aesthetic of the Cool.” Signifyin(g), Sanctifyin, & Slam Dunking: A Reader in African American Expressive Culture. Ed. Gena Dagel Caponi. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999. Print.
  • Thompson, Robert Farris. African Art in Motion. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974. Print.
  • Thompson, Robert Farris. “Dance and Culture: An Aesthetic of the Cool.” Afternoon Forum. Fall issue (1966) Print.
  • Thompson, Robert Farris. Flash of the Spirit: African and Afro-American Art and Philosophy. New York: Random House, 1983. Print.
  • Thorpe, Edward. Black Dance. New York: Overlook Press. 1990. Print.
  • Ventura, Michael. “Hear That Long Snake Moan.” Shadow Dancing in the U.S.A. New York: Putnam Publishing Group. 1986. Print.
  • Ventura, Michael. “White Boys Dancing.” Shadow Dancing in the U.S.A. Kirkwood, New York: Putnam Publishing Group. 1986. Print.
  • Vincent, Rickey. Funk: The Music, the People, and the Rhythm of the One. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin. 1996. Print.
  • Walker, Rebecca. Black Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness. Berkeley: Soft Skull Press, 2012. Print.
  • Watson, Steve. The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930 New York: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. 1995. Print.
  • Welsh Asante, Kariamu. The African American Aesthetic: Keepers of the Tradition. London: Praeger. 1994. Print.
  • Wilson, James. Bulldaggers, Pansies, and Chocolate Babies: Performance, Race, and Sexuality in the Harlem Renaissance. Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2010. Print.
  • Wintz, Cary D. and Paul Finkelman, eds. Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance: K-Y Index Volume 2. New York: Taylor and Francis Books, 2004. Print.
  • Wright, John S. “Jazz, Modern Dance and the Art of Extrapolation.” Modern Dance, Jazz Music and American Culture. Gerald E. Meyers, ed. American Dance Festival and the John F. Kennedy Center for The Performing Arts. February 2000.
  • Young, Harvey. Embodying Black Experience: Stillness, Critical Memory, and the Black Body. Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2010. Print.
  • Yearwood, Gladstone, L. Black Film as a Signifying Practice: Cinema, Narration and the African-American Aesthetic Tradition. Trenton, New Jersey: Africa World Press, 2000. Print.

Periodicals

  • Daly, Ann. “New World A-Comin’: A Century of Jazz and Modern Dance.” Modern Dance, Jazz Music and American Culture. Ed. Gerald E. Meyers. American Dance Festival and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. 2000. Print.
  • Hurwitt, Sam. “The Beat Goes On: Allen Ginsberg helps beatnik go mainstream at de Young”. San Francisco Examiner, 3 October 1996. daily ed., C1+. Print.
  • Lewis, Julinda. “The Invisible Generation of New Dance Makers: Black Post Moderns.” Talking Drums! The Black Dance Newsletter 1.3 (1989): page numbers. Print.
  • Locke, Alain Leroy. Negro Art Past and Present. Washington, D.C.: Associates in Negro Folk Education,1936. Print.
  • Myers, Gerald E., ed. Modern Dance, Jazz Music and American Culture. American Dance Festival and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Feb 2000. Print.
  • McFadden, Robert D. “Dancer’s Long Journey Home.” San Francisco Chronicle. 14 April 1998. Section/Page (example: “D5+”) Newspaper.
  • Paris, Carl, “Defining the African American Presence in Postmodern Dance from the Judson Church Era to the 1990s” Congress on Research and Dance Conference (34) 2001 Volume 1, 324-243.
  • Simpkinson, Anne. “A Self of One’s Own.” Common Boundary. (March/April 1990): 14-20. Print.
  • Walters, Barry. “Learning to Funk the Bomb.” Village Voice. 16 August 1985. Print.
  • White, Charles. “Negro Minstrelsy: Its Starting Place Traced Back Over Sixty Years, Arranged and Compiled from the Best Authorities.” New York Clipper, 28 April 1860. Newspaper.

Academic Journals

  • Brooks, Daphne Ann. “The End of the Line: Josephine Baker and the Politics of Black Women’s Corporeal Comedy.” The Scholar and Feminist Online 6.1-6.2 (2008): Web. 12 Feb. 2012.
  • Baptist, Edward E. “‘Cuffy,’ ‘Fancy Maids,’ and ‘One-Eyed Men’: Rape, Commodification, and the Domestic Slave Trade in the United States.” The American Historical Review 106.5 (2001): 1619-1650. Web. 6 Feb. 2012.
  • Davis, Dora. “‘De Talkin’ Game’: The Creation of Psychic Space in Selected Short Fiction of Zora Neale Hurston.” Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 26.2 (2007): 269-286. Print.
  • Fennell. Christopher C. “Group Identity, Individual Creativity, and Symbolic Generation in a BaKongo Diaspora.” International Journal of Historical Archeology, Vol 7, No. 1, March 2003. Print
  • Grandt, Jurgen E. “Kinds of Blue: Toni Morrison, Hans Janowitz, and the Jazz Aesthetic.” African American Review 38.2 (2004): 303-322. Web. 26 Jun. 2011.
  • Kraut, Anthea. “”Stealing Steps” and Signature Moves: Embodied Theories of Dance as Intellectual Property.” Theatre Journal 62, no. 2 (2010): 173-89. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40660601.
  • Kraut, Anthea. “Between Primitivism and Diaspora: The Dance Performances of Josephine Baker, Zora Neale Hurston, and Katherine Dunham.” Theatre Journal 55, no. 3 (2003): 433-50. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25069279.
  • James, Willis Lawrence. “The Romance of the Negro Folk Cry in America.” Phylon 16.1 (1955): 15-30.
  • Martin, Denise. “Pan African Metaphysical Epistemology: A Pentagonal Introduction.” The Journal of Pan African Studies 2.3 (2008): PDF file.
  • Martin, Christopher Tremewan. How The Waltz Has Won: Towards a Waltz Aesthetic. Diss. University of Maryland, 2010. College Park, 2010. Print.
  • Napier, Winston. “From the Shadows: Houston Baker’s Move Toward A Postnationalist Appraisal of the Black Aesthetic.” New Literary History 25.1 (1994): 159-74. Print.
  • Szwed, John F. and Morton Marks. “The Afro-American Transformation of European Set Dances and Dance Suites.” Dance Research Journal 20.1. Chicago: University of Illinois Press. 1998. Print.
  • Townsend, D. R. and Lapp, D. “Academic language, discourse communities, and technology: Building students’ linguistic resources.
” Teacher Education Quarterly, Special Online Edition. Web. Access Date 2010.
  • Weixlmann, Joe, ed. African American Review. 28.2 (1994) Division on Black American Literature and Culture of the Modern Language Association. Terre Haute, Indiana: Indiana State University Press. Print.
  • Willingham, Daniel T. “Inflexible Knowledge: The First Step to Expertise.” American Educator. American Federation of Teachers. Winter 2002. Print.

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Web Resources

  • Early, Gerald. “Jazz and the African American Literary Tradition.” Freedom’s Story: Teaching African American Literature and History. National Humanities Center. Web. Jan. 2011.
  • Ellington, Duke. “East St. Louis Tootle-Oo.” Perf. Mura Dehn and Roger Pryor Dodge. Web. <pryordodge.com>. 4 April 2012. Screen shot.
  • Feinberg, David. “Slavery in Virginia: A Selected Biography.” The Library of Virginia. Feb. 2007. PDF file.
  • Gates, Henry Louis, Jr. “The New Negro and the Black Image: From Booker T. Washington to Alain Locke.” Freedom’s Story: Teaching African American Literature and History. National Humanities Center. Web. 22 April, 2011.
  • Halbersber, Elianne. Planet Ill. Web. 8 July 2010.
  • Harris, Trudier. “The Trickster in African American Literature.” Freedom’s Story: Teaching African American Literature and History. National Humanities Center. Web. 10 April 2011.
  • Heath, Barbara and Amber Bennett. “The little Spots allow’d them”: The Archaeological Study of African-American Yards.” Historical Archaeology. Web. 31, January 2014.
  • Johnson, David. “Uncovering African Roots: DNA Test, New Technology Reveal African Heritage.” Fact Monster, 2002. Web. 4 November 2008.
  • Ladzekpo, C. K. “Some Facts About Sub-Saharan Dance-Drumming.” We Speak in Many Voices of Africa! 1995. Web. 15 March 1991.
  • “Legacy, Awards and Achievements.” Raymovie.com. <www.raymovie.com/raycharles/the_legacy_awards_and_achievements.html>.
  • Michael, Jennifer. “African American Step Show.” California: California Academy of Sciences. 2000. Web. 20 Aug. 2003.
  • Nash, William R. “Harlem Renaissance.” Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature – Online Database. Web. 24 Sept. 2012.
  • “The Prodigal Prince Comes to Life.” When Steel Talks. Web. 10 Dec. 2008.
  • YouTube. “Catching the Ghost” (Director: Chad Ross – Film by Isaac Pierre Racine & Lydia Zimmerman)
  • YouTube. “Video explains the world’s most important 6-sec drum loop”. Web. 20 November 2012 and 23 September 2013.
  • Visual Thesaurus. ThinkMap, Inc. <http://www.visualthesaurus.com/&gt;. Web. Access dates 2009-2014.
  • NPS – National Park Service Ethnography Program: African American Heritage and Ethnography http://cr.nps.gov/ethnography/aah/aaheritage/contents.htm. Web. 30, January, 2014
  • Wikipedia contributors. “Carl Van Vechten”. Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Web. 20 Nov 2011.
  • Wikipedia contributors. “Connections (TV series).” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Web. 15 June 2011.
  • Wikipedia contributors. “Cool Timeline”. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Web. 21 May 2009.
  • Wikipedia contributors. “The Dozens.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.
  • Wikipedia contributors. “History of Lindy Hop.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.
  • Wikipedia contributors. “Sampling (music).” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Web. 11 July 2012.

This is just a small sampling of resources on the African-American Aesthetic. Please feel free to add those you have found intriqing or informative.